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Kathy LaPan:

  • " Why Christianity is exclusive: the only true religion "
  • " Postmodern Relativism vs. Ultimate Truth "

Unity: Anon: " The need for Jewish unity
  Violence, religiously inspired: Jon Brodkin: " While prayer is peaceful, violence is often in name of God " James Peter Jandu: " Jungle Justice and Lynch Mob Mentality. Causes and cures " Rabbi Allen S. Maller: " God's commandment against religious extremism " Vladimir Tomek: " Passages advocating violence and genocide in religious texts "
  Worldview : See Beliefs

Other topics: Anon: " How to dance in the rain: a message of enduring love " Anon: "Requiem For A Dream: The Decline Of American Values" .: " Role playing games and Christianity " Andrew Graham: "Did Jerusalem fall in 586 or 607 BCE?" Rebuttal essay by Doug Mason: " The Bible and the destruction of Jerusalem"

The novel also deals with several sensitive issues such as suicide and the onset of sexuality in adolescence. Jonas, under the encouragement of The Giver, explores aspects of human nature that are never faced by the other members of the community. Jonas thus, in significant ways, becomes more of a mature adult than his parents are. Whereas his parents have never experienced the Stirrings and thus have suppressed all sexual desire, Jonas eventually ceases taking the pills in favor of embracing this aspect of his coming of age. The inclusion of such topics as budding sexuality has in the past led The Giver to be banned by many school libraries, but defenders have argued that it is important to engage topics of death and sexuality among young adults.

Contemporary academic studies of the term further characterize its usage in philosophical discourses. In "Aporetics: Rational Deliberation in the Face of Inconsistency" (2009), Nicholas Rescher is concerned with the methods in which an aporia, or "apory", is intellectually processed and resolved. In the Preface, Rescher identifies the work as an attempt to "synthesize and systematize an aporetic procedure for dealing with information overload (of 'cognitive dissonance', as it is sometimes called)" (ix). The text is also useful in that it provides a more precise (although specialized) definition of the concept: "any cognitive situation in which the threat of inconsistency confronts us" (1). Rescher further introduces his specific study of the apory by qualifying the term as "a group of individually plausible but collectively incompatible theses", a designation he illustrates with the following syllogism or "cluster of contentions":

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